ACT YOUR AGE DRAMA PROJECTS

PRESENTS A REHEARSED READING OF THE PLAY

'WASH-HOUSE STORIES'

ABOUT

THE OLD FULHAM WASH-HOUSE

Being Performed On The Original Site of Fulham’s Former Wash-House in North End Rd. Paying Tribute To All Of Women Who Washed There...

Scripted and Directed by Rosalind Scanlon

Wash-House Stories pays tribute to the memories of the 100s of local women who used Fulham Wash-House during the 1950s, 1960s and 70s. Before families could afford to have their own Washing Machine, (a luxury good at the time,) public Wash-Houses were a necessary place for working class women.

On Washday women would be seen pushing their prams and trolleys, full of blankets, sheets, towels and bedspreads, along the North End Road.  At the time, families were large and many of the women were land-lady’s, so they would do the washing for their families and for their lodgers. Because it was impossible to do the ‘Big Wash’ in the sink at home, they would take it to get it washed, spun, dried and ironed at Fulham Wash-House, for just a few shillings! Fulham’s Wash-House was a women’s hub, beating at the heart of the community.

It was not only a place where women came together to wash and scrub, but it was also a place where they could meet each other, make friends, share their troubles, their worries and their stories during hard times… 

 This ‘Pop Up Rehearsed Play-Reading’ of  WASH-HOUSE STORIES will feature some members of Act Your Age Drama, a local drama group for older women (aged 55 plus) based at The Macbeth Centre. The cast will also feature some of the original women who used Fulham Wash House during the 1960s and 1970s

Saturday & Sunday June 10th & 11th at 7.30pm

Dance Attic Studios 368 North End Rd SW6 1LY

Entrance: £7.00

Book Tickets: www.irishculturalcentre.co.uk

Please note advance booking is advisable

For More Information Contact Rosalind Scanlon on 07742320001

Presented in Association with Hammersmith & Fulham Arts Festival and AGE WELL, The Macbeth Centre, LBHF Adult Learning and Skills Service.

Supported By